A glycine receptor is involved in the organization of swimming movements in an invertebrate chordate

Atsuo Nishino, Yasushi Okamura, Stefania Piscopo, Euan R Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rhythmic motor patterns for locomotion in vertebrates are generated in spinal cord neural networks known as spinal Central Pattern Generators (CPGs). A key element in pattern generation is the role of glycinergic synaptic transmission by interneurons that cross the cord midline and inhibit contralaterally-located excitatory neurons. The glycinergic inhibitory drive permits alternating and precisely timed motor output during locomotion such as walking or swimming. To understand better the evolution of this system we examined the physiology of the neural network controlling swimming in an invertebrate chordate relative of vertebrates, the ascidian larva Ciona intestinalis.
Original languageEnglish
Article number6
JournalBMC Neuroscience
Volume11
Issue numbern/a
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Jan 2010

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Nonvertebrate Chordata
Glycine Receptors
Locomotion
Vertebrates
Ciona intestinalis
Central Pattern Generators
Urochordata
Interneurons
Synaptic Transmission
Walking
Larva
Spinal Cord
Neurons

Cite this

Nishino, Atsuo ; Okamura, Yasushi ; Piscopo, Stefania ; Brown, Euan R. / A glycine receptor is involved in the organization of swimming movements in an invertebrate chordate. In: BMC Neuroscience. 2010 ; Vol. 11, No. n/a.
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A glycine receptor is involved in the organization of swimming movements in an invertebrate chordate. / Nishino, Atsuo; Okamura, Yasushi; Piscopo, Stefania; Brown, Euan R.

In: BMC Neuroscience, Vol. 11, No. n/a, 6, 19.01.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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